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1.Ha Kome Cave Houses

near Teya-teyaneng, Berea district.

Houses built in the 19th century, inside of a large cave, by different clans of people who were fleeing Shaka Zulu, leader of the Zulu people. This is now a National Heritage Site. The people living in the houses today are descendants of their ancestors who settled the site. It is possible to take a tour of the caves, and discover its deeper history, and you may be invited to tour some of the interiors and meet the current inhabitants, whom are still living a traditional lifestyle.

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2. Plowing the fields

taken in Quthing province.

The males in the family are plowing their fields, and preparing to plant corn or sorghum. The women in the family cook lunch, and bring it to the fields (not pictured).

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3. A Masotho woman carries wood

taken at the border of rural Quthing and Mohale’s Hoek province, in Southern Lesotho. It is usually the women's and girl's job to carry wood to her house, for building fires for cooking and keeping warm. It gets cold in the mountains at night, and even snows in winter.
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Brief Message.

Artist bioWendy Stein earned her B.A. In studio art/graphic design from Michigan State University. She showed her work in East Lansing, MI before moving to San Francisco, CA and refocusing her skills in the new media and video game industry, where she contributed graphics to the release of three games.Since her last showing in Sakai, she successfully completed her service with the U.S. Peace Corps in Lesotho, Southern Africa, where she contributed to the creative and health education of the Basotho people.
She currently lives and works in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where she recently exhibited her photos of Basotho Dwellings, and is currently working on a book of stories and photos from Lesotho. For more information, please visit https://www.flickr.com/photos/gypsyflower/ .

I am delighted to participate in this exhibit for the second time. I’ve included landscapes, dwellings, and portraits of the Basotho people, from the mountain kingdom of Lesotho, Southern Africa, where I lived and worked in a remote rural village, (without running water or electricity), for 2+ years. These photos are the result of my time and work in the area. My goal is to raise awareness of the life and work of the Basotho people, through pictures and stories, and to show another perspective of Africa. Proceeds from the sale of these photos will be sent to the Seforong Community Group, earmarked for designated projects in the village, to benefit vulnerable populations and youth.

Here is a brief description of the three photos. Pricing is $100USD/photo. All photoss are 8x10"
1. Ha Kome Cave Houses near Teya-teyaneng, Berea district. Houses built in the 19th century, inside of a large cave, by different clans of people who were fleeing Shaka Zulu, leader of the Zulu people. This is now a National Heritage Site. The people living in the houses today are descendants of their ancestors who settled the site. It is possible to take a tour of the caves, and discover its deeper history, and you may be invited to tour some of the interiors and meet the current inhabitants, whom are still living a traditional lifestyle.